Jamee Natella

CEO of Blueyed Pictures is a global film and multimedia producer that has created an incredible footprint in the industry, known for her production work with some of the world’s largest companies in Tokyo, London and Los Angeles, producing for television, films, commercials, digital branded content, and multimedia. Known for her production work with some of the worlds largest companies – including Toyota, Virgin America, Lexus, Mitsubishi and Pepsi. She founded Blueyed Pictures in 1998, a global production company with hubs in Tokyo, London and Los Angeles. Most recently, Natella produced JL Family Ranch 2 for Hallmark, set to release in 2020, and is currently in development on a studio feature film called, “Nightmare 19.” In her spare time, Jamee enjoys writing her series of children’s books, titled “I am Sam,” which teaches young children about different cultures globally.

Q: How did you get started in your career?  “I began working at Warner Brothers, Touchstone and various production companies in Los Angeles. After I produced my first short film, I decided to take a leap and produce a TV show in Tokyo. While living in Tokyo for eight years, I found that many of my friends in the United States were contacting me for their localized production needs. Through these projects, I recognized an amazing business opportunity in helping U.S. producers create content with bilingual crews overseas.”

Q: What has been your greatest milestone?  “I am still striving to hit the milestones I want to hit, but I know I have accomplished a great deal. One of the things I am most proud of in my career is being known for my versatility. Often, producers will get pigeon-holed into very specific styles of production-long format or short format, AR or VR- but because of my diverse skill set and expertise, I am able to work on movies, TV shows, commercials and big events. But to answer your question… I consider each new project to be an important milestone in my career. I’m always growing, learning and reinventing myself  to adapt to this constantly changing industry.” 

Q:  What does it mean to you to be a female producer? “Commitment. Compassion. Tenacity. Sacrifice. Listening. Long hours. Hard work. Responsibility. Stability. I feel very fortunate to be a female producer. With that comes gratitude and a sense of responsibility to other female producers. While leading the way for future female generations, I do not take one project for granted. There is a great deal of sacrifice involved in this career. From the moment I commit to a project, I am fully immersed from start to finish. As a producer, I am involved in every stage of production: development, pre-production, production, post-production, acquisitions, and marketing. The producer is the glue that holds everything together, from putting out daily fires to seeing the project through to the very end. The entertainment industry is not an easy business. Women are very well suited to be good producers because they are nurturing, good listeners, and able to find balance and multi-task. It’s in our nature to be caring and helpful. We’re like that with our families and friends and that lends itself very well to production because you need these kinds of skills, particularly when it comes to organization and communicating in a sensitive but effective manner on set.” 

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Q: Words of advice for other women in the film industry?  “Female empowerment movements all over the world are bringing women to the forefront of every industry. Now more than ever, women have the opportunity to speak up, especially if they have a project they want to produce. My advice for women is to use your voice… and I don’t mean you have to be loud! Just know what you want and go after it. There’s a great quote from Patty Jenkins: ‘Don’t stop believing in the power of your experience.’ Believe in yourself, know what you have accomplished and remember that what you bring to the table matters and has merit. When you want to pursue something, be confident and don’t take things personally. In the entertainment business, you will receive a lot of constructive criticism, take it and turn it into something positive. If you perceive the criticism in a more positive way, I promise you will struggle less.”

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