Pastors Echo The Need For the Church to Rise Up

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In times like this, we turn to our faith for guidance and comfort. Pastors across the nation are vocalizing the need for the church to rise up and are expressing the pain, desires and prayers they are encountering. 

  1. Sarah Jakes Roberts

I watched the video and before I could even try to suppress them, the tears slid down my face. I don’t want to be numb to this pain. I want it to be gut wrenching and heartbreaking every time. I don’t want to be desensitized by the trauma. I want to feel it like it’s fresh every time. I can’t afford for my passion to see change to ever dull or diminish. 

Today my heart is heavy, because another life has gone too soon. Usually this pain is only on the shoulder of people who hold my hue, but today I’ve seen so many of my white friends and colleagues grieve with us too. This is not just a black issue. This is an American issue. When the protests for change begin to look as diverse as the people in this country I believe we’ll see the pendulum of justice get the momentum it needs to swing. 

Speaking out against injustice can be intimidating when you don’t know what to say, but I promise you it matters. We don’t want you to be colorblind because you may miss our plight. See us as people: father, mothers, sons, daughters, brothers, and sisters. See our tears. Hear our cry. Think of us when you vote. Think of us when you pray. If we lock arms together we can push darkness away. 

The voices of minorities (black, brown, yellow, and in between) are amplified when the majority echoes our pain. Today I’m grateful that so many people I admire used their microphone to speak up. Don’t forget to use yours.

Image and caption credit: Sarah Jakes Roberts Instagram
  1. Brian Houston

“This moment in history could be a moment of transformation and change. Racism has to be crushed NOW and forever, and ALL people must be treated equal. It’s time for affirmative action. Let’s take our stand.”

Image and caption credit: Brian Houston Instagram
  1. Michael Todd

God Protect Me ??

God Protect My Son

God Protect Brothers

God Protect Father

God Protect Everyone with my skin color

Image and caption credit: Michael Todd Instagram
  1. T.D. Jakes

Justice for George Floyd

How does one live comfortably in such a time? How are we supposed to handle the outward expressions of those ravaged by the disease of hatred?⁣

Ignoring it is not the answer; even if we turn our heads away, the images and sounds of injustice continue to haunt us. ⁣

My heart is unexplainably heavy. We must have a conversation!⁣ @colorofchange

Text Floyd to 55156⁣

#JusticeForFloyd

Image and caption credit: T.D. Jakes Instagram
  1. Jeremy Johnson

America’s a war zone

Pray for our streets. Pray new laws that protect its citezens would arise through this. That love would win. That our brothers and sisters feel safe heard and home in America. We need real change that is long past due. #blacklivesmatter#la #2020 #rasismsucks #dtla

Image and caption credit: Jeremy Johnson Instagram
  1. Christine Caine

“I used to sit back and see videos like this and think to myself, “Let’s wait for all the details to come out.” Now after seeing too many videos like this to name I’m beginning to wonder if my response should have been, “Maybe I should try to understand their pain.” Sometimes we can be so blinded by our experience and reality that we invalidate someone else’s. Today our black brothers and sisters are experiencing another trauma that communicates to them that their lives aren’t valuable. Centuries of reoccurring trauma takes its toll on a people group. Today I choose to lay down my preconceptions to learn from my friends of color. If we are truly the body of Christ one pain affects us all. We aren’t just the body when it’s convenient. We are the body when it’s hurting and broken. No more than the leg can disconnect from the arm can I disconnect my pain from that of my brethren. I’d like to share what I’m learning with you. On Thursday evening I’m going to do an Instagram Live with my friend Dr Anita Phillips and I invite you to join us. This has to change.”

Image and caption credit: Christine Caine Instagram
  1. Touré Roberts

“Yesterday was another extremely tough day for an entire community of people.⁣⁣⁣

⁣⁣⁣Once again we experienced the type of pain African Americans know all too well, and in many instances the pain is exacerbated by the deafening silence from those outside our community.⁣⁣⁣

⁣⁣⁣Yesterday my heart was encouraged some to see voices in the Kingdom who were not black cry out against these injustices with a genuine desire to be educated on how they can do their part to help in our struggle. I am of the belief that it will be the beginning of something beautiful. ⁣⁣⁣

⁣⁣⁣Often times the residual pain of the silence from outside our community can make us suspicious and even cynical of that type of support but I believe if we are going to prevail we will need to find a way to move past that. I do believe that their consistency and commitment over time will help us to get there. ⁣⁣

⁣⁣Let’s be patient with each other and I believe God will weave something beautiful among us that racism, nor the very gates of hell themselves will be able to withstand.⁣⁣⁣

⁣⁣⁣Mucho amor familia! ⁣

#justiceforgeorgefloyd#justiceforahmaud#justiceforahmaudarbery

Image and caption credit: Touré Roberts Instagram
  1. Erwin McManus

“With the death of George Floyd as the result of police brutality we are again facing the harsh reality of our country’s condition regarding racism, inequality, and mutual respect.

I am so sick of all the excuses and justifications.

I love this country and grieve as we confront a history of injustice and violence especially towards the African American community.

Enough is enough.

We must speak out and wage a war of peace and justice against the status quo of indifference.

Our work is not done until each of us are protected equally under the law.

Our work is not done until hate and intolerance are made unacceptable in our communities, in our homes, and in our hearts.

Our work is not done until everyone knows they are valued, andloved, and know that their lives matter.

As an immigrant I know first hand the inequity and prejudice that has marked too much of our history and society as a whole.

There will be some who will once again argue that this is not a racial issue. Some who even believe racism is a thing of the past.

Not everyone is a racist. Not every act of injustice is fueled by racism.

There are other factors such as socio-economic inequities that also create bias.

Law enforcement is an imperfect work done by flawed humans who are also influenced by fear, arrogance, past experiences, and their own prejudices.

Some will refuse to open their eyes to what their biases and even white privilege will not allow them to see.

There are always those who will tell me to stop being political and stick to the gospel.

You only say this because it goes against your politics.

You are more than willing to bring Jesus into politics when it matters to you.

I will always speak my mind and share my heart when I am compelled to do so without hesitation.

There will be others who will want to paint all law enforcement as corrupt and criminal, and justify a prejudice against the color blue.

This would be a tragedy.

There are so many good men and women police officers and I am personally grateful for all of them.

Others will want to use a broad stroke and indite the entirety of American history and paint all the U.S. as evil, and lose sight that we live in one of the most extraordinary countries in the world, and in fact, all of human history.

All nations are imperfect and carry a history they wish had been different —— and should have been better.

I love and respect my country of choice. I chose to become an American citizen. I am proud to make this my home and my country.

I was not born here.

I choose to live here —— in the land of the brave and the free.

It is in this spirit that I must speak out.

It is because I believe in us that I must demand we do better.

It is because we have the potential and responsibility to be a beacon of hope, liberty, and justice for all that we must take up this fight.

We must wave the flag of peace and not the flag of surrender.

We must speak out for George Floyd and the culture of injustice this moment represents.

The wind has been knocked out of us.

It is hard to breathe.

We should all be having a hard time breathing.

As  a follower of Jesus, I am compelled to not only speak out but to come to the defense of those who are defenseless.

This is a stark reminder that humanity desperately needs Jesus.

I pray that one day before I leave earth, letters like this will no longer be needed.

I pray for a future where we can all breathe.”

Image and caption credit: Erwin McManus Instagram
  1. Kel Mitchell

If Jesus is your savior then you better watch your behavior in every situation remember your salvation. Be good to one another your sister and your brother!! ???

Nelson Mandela said it best when he said..

“No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin, or his background, or his religion. People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite.”??❤️ and let me just give you a friendly reminder JESUS IS LOVE! Hate is in the world and continues to show it’s face! That is why we as believers we must continue to fight the GOOD fight of Faith and lead all to God. #spiritualwarfare

Image and caption credit: Kel Mitchell Instagram
  1. Albert Tate

“While I appreciate the voices of white leaders coming in and saying, ‘I see this. I saw the video. It’s undeniable. It’s terrible.’ While I appreciate that, I am also frustrated that it took a video for you to believe my tears.”

Image and caption credit: Albert Tate Instagram
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